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Learning - College and Trade Participation

Relevance

Participation in a college or trade program provides students with a solid base for future employment and encourages social interaction. Courses of study offered through college and trade programs tend to be more job-related than those offered in universities. They offer students the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge that are important to Canada's economic performance.

The college and trade participation indicator is one of two indicators addressing participation in post-secondary education. It measures the proportion of individuals who are participating in college or trade/vocational programs with the intent of achieving a certificate, degree, or diploma. These data are from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), which includes trade and vocational studies under the definition of college. Another measure for this indicator deals with a specific type of program: Registered Apprenticeship Training. This measure highlights some of the most recent information on enrolment in registered apprenticeship training programs.[1]

Summary

  • National Picture — In 2005-2006, participation rates for college and trade programs were generally higher for those aged 18 to 21 than for those in the 22 to 24 age group. In that academic year, 18% of the population aged 18 to 21 participated in a college or trade education compared with 9% of those aged 22 to 24.
  • Gender — The proportions of both men and women participating in college and trade education increased from 1990-1991 to 2005-2006; however, rates of participation were higher for women than for men.
  • Age — Rates of participation increased for those under the age of 30 years of age between 1990-1991 and 2005-2006. During that period, rates rose two percentage points for those aged 18 to 24, and roughly one percentage point for those aged 25 to 29.
  • Regions — Between the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 academic years, average participation rates ranged from a high of 19% in Quebec to a low of 7% in Saskatchewan.
  • Registered Apprenticeship Training — Enrolment in registered apprenticeship training in Canada has increased steadily since 1995, reaching a high of 293,835 in 2005.

National Picture

Overall, college participation rates were relatively stable between 1990-1991 and 2005-2006. The average change was roughly 2.5 percentage points for the 18 to 24 age groups, with participation rates being highest in 2001-2002 at 16%.

For those aged 18 to 24, participation rates for the 18 to 21 age group were nearly twice those of the 22 to 24 age group for all academic years between 1990-1991 and 2005-2006. The highest rates of participation for both age groups were in 2001-2002, when the rate for the younger age group reached a high of 20%, and the rate for those aged 22 to 24 reached 10%. Participation rates for both age groups decreased slightly in 2005-2006, to 18% for those aged 18 to 21, and to 9% for those aged  22 to 24.


This Chart contains data for Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, Canada, 1991-2006. Information is available in table below

Note: Figures are based on the academic year from September to April. Years correspond to the year in which the academic period ended (e.g., the academic year 1990-1991 appears as 1991).

Source: Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, Canada, 1991-2006 (percent)
1991199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006
18-21 years15.31818.318.219.218.919.119.82019.719.720.319.81920.218.4
22-24 years7.27.37.68.28.29.29.49.59.999.210.39.59.59.68.8
18-24 years11.713.313.513.814.314.814.915.415.815.215.316.115.41515.614.2

Gender

Participation in college and trade education increased slightly for both men and women between 1990-1991 and 2005-2006. Participation rates rose from 12% to 15% for women, while rates for men rose from 11% to 13%. Participation rates were higher among women than among men aged 18 to 24 for all years between 1990-1991 and 2005-2006.[2]


This Chart contains data for Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, by gender,  1990-1991 and 2005-2006. Information is available in table below

Source: Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, by gender, 1990-1991 and 2005-2006 (percent)
MenWomen
1990-19911112
2005-20061315

Age

Rates of participation in college and trade education were lower for persons in higher age groups in both 1990-1991 and 2005-2006, while the rates for those 30 years of age and under increased over time. Participation rates were highest for the group aged 18 to 24, and lowest for the group aged 30 to 64; some 14% of those aged 18 to 24 participated in college or trade education in the 2005-2006 academic year, compared with 1% of those aged 30 to 64. The greatest increase in the participation rate occurred for those aged 18 to 24 (2 percentage points). 


This Chart contains data for Participation in college and trade education, by age, 1990-1991 and 2005-2006. Information is available in table below

Source: Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Participation in college and trade education, by age, 1990-1991 and 2005-2006 (percent)
18-24 years25-29 years30-64 years
1990-19911231
2005-20061441

Regions

Across Canada, average participation rates in college and trade education for the academic years 2003-2004 to 2005-2006 ranged from a low of 7% in Saskatchewan to a high of 19% in Quebec. However, participation in pre-university programs is a mandatory requirement for students wishing to pursue education at the university level in Quebec. About 60% of the participation rate for college and trade education in Quebec can be attributed to this requirement.[3]  In provinces such as Alberta and British Columbia, however, those registered in university programs offered in colleges are generally considered to be university students for the purposes of the Labour Force Survey.

Participation rates for college and trade education were higher in large urban areas (16%) than in smaller urban areas, towns, and rural communities (14%) in 2005-2006.[4]


This Chart contains data for Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, by region,  2003-2004 to 2005-2006. Information is available in table below

Note: Data are based on a three-year average for the academic years 2003-2004 to 2005-2006.

Source: Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Participation in college and trade education, population 18-24 years, by region, 2003-2004 to 2005-2006 (percent)
CANNLPEINSNBQCONMASKABBC
15109891915871417

Registered Apprenticeship Training

Registered apprenticeship training refers to training in trades that is generally undertaken under a formal agreement between an apprentice, an employer or joint training board, and a provincial or territorial government. It includes a combination of both on-the-job training and more formal, in-class instruction.[5]  The total number of persons registered in recognized apprenticeship training programs increased steadily after 1995, reaching a high of 293,835 registrations in 2005. However, the number of completions has not generally been growing as fast as the number of registrations. Although the number of apprentices who received certfication reached a high of 20,555 in 2005, the rate of increase for registrations was more than double the rate for completions.


This Chart contains data for Enrolment in registered apprenticeship training, Canada, 1991-2005. Information is available in table below

Source: Statistics Canada. Registered apprenticeship training, registrations by major trade groups and sex, annual (number) (CANSIM Table 477-0051). Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2007; and Statistics Canada. Registered apprenticeship training, completions by major trade groups and sex, annual (number) (CANSIM Table 477-0052). Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2007.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Enrolment in registered apprenticeship training, Canada, 1991-2005 (number of apprentices)
199119921993199419951996199719981999200020012002200320042005
Total Registrations192,946180,963168,983163,752163,372165,324171,181175,962186,386199,073215,246231,413249,837267,775293,835
Completions19,72418,72018,41116,80117,07516,07516,37016,46518,54418,39518,47316,69218,34519,70520,555

Footnotes

  1. Data from the Community College Student Information System are not included. The last year for which college enrolment data were available, based on this national survey, was 1998-1999.[Back to Text]
  2. Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.

    [Back to Text]
  3. Quebec. Indicateurs de l'Éducation - Édition 2006. Quebec, Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport.[Back to Text]
  4. Calculations of HRSDC based on special data request from Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2006. Ottawa, Statistics Canada, 2006.

    [Back to Text]
  5. For more information, see the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum website at http://www.caf-fca.org.[Back to Text]

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